Monday, April 28, 2008

Residency Brats



You've heard of Army brats. Well, there's another breed out there. We're raising some of our own, seen above with the children of two other Resident families. Their fathers are not gone 9 to 5. In fact there is no rhyme or reason to the absence or presence of Dad in their little worlds. Some days he never steps foot in their waking hours. Some days he's home for the morning's bustle, making pancakes or lounging on the playroom rug for mega lego construction. Or maybe in the evening (Mom's favorite) when a better job is then done on the teeth brushing and flossing. The table fills up for dinner with real food and a warm body in every seat. A certain energy is injected with his presence alone. Mom will sometimes disappear. The house is messier, less is accomplished but many more smiles are spread.


They are not worse for wear. They accept. They accept that he's gone. They accept that he's hear. No grudges cloud their relationship with Dad. Their company to me is welcome on long days when those same grudges have made mom a bit too hazy for normal functioning capacity.

7 comments:

Katy said...

(The pregnancy widget on the side isn't accurate, is it? There is absolutely no room for that baby to turn in circles at this point! Nor do anything else, for that matter.)

I know nothing of the residency world in my own life. Perhaps the life of a student would most resemble it? Hopefully with this new job, you'll enjoy the luxury of more consistency in your life.

Julia said...

Wow, that will be my life in a few months when my little guy arrives, and will probably be the childhood for all of my children (my husband is taking a very long road). So many of my friends that grew up as "residency brats" thought that their dad lived at the hospital. It is a strange reality, and hard for the rest of the world to understand in so many ways. But it is worth it.

I hope your little one arrives soon, I can't wait to meet her and find out the name you've picked.

Becca said...

"army brats" is sort of like the term "white trash", both of which make me cringe a little. it's mercifully amazing that children are so resilient. you're so close to welcoming number four in the ex-utero flesh! best of luck with the transition in all dimensions.

Mark said...

You and Craig live a very asymmetrical routine, a difficult one at that. I can only imagine the dynamics required in the relationship to hold it all together. To be flexible enough to change your perspective when you encounter each new challenge and focus on it from a positive angle is a gift. You & Craig both have this gift, we admire you for it. Love you guys.

Melissa said...

Every morning Jaxen asks "Will I see dad today?", then I have to check the calendar because I have stopped trying to remember his hours. We're right there with you!!!

Melissa said...

Every morning Jaxen asks "Will I see dad today?", then I have to check the calendar because I have stopped trying to remember his hours. We're right there with you!!!

Ingrid said...

Oh this sounds all too familiar. I honestly don't think people know the life of a resident's family unless they are right there living it themselves, and even then, some fields have it better than others. We just live month to month... It's a thrilling ride! I'm right there with you Jordan - just a few more months...